Treeborn

Treeborn Chestnuts

Made with ❤ in Michigan

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Chestnut
Champions

Welcome to Treeborn

Welcome to the world of Michigan chestnuts.  At TREEBORN, we make chestnuts like no one else in the WORLD. We take the unique chestnut from our SUSTAINABLY-GROWN trees in Michigan and turn the chestnuts into small wafers we call chestnut chips.  MEL TORME would be so proud of us. Who's Mel Torme? Hint: (https://youtu.be/XdRTVpeAHFI) These chips can be stored without using energy and when needed we turn them into GLUTEN-FREE CHESTNUT FLOUR or chestnut CHIPS for the BREWING INDUSTRY.  Why the brewing industry? Because chestnuts make beer taste better!!!

 

Chestnut chips

Chestnut
Pioneers

 

"All of the ingredients come from the earth"

The history of chestnut beer in Michigan as told by Gabrielle Russon, reporter for the State News, April 14, 2006

Some days Jeffries spends up to 12 hours making beer at his microbrewery, Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales in Dexter, about an hour away from campus. Jeffries, who opened the microbrewery two years ago, does everything from his own brewing to bottling and labeling the finished product at Jolly Pumpkin. He brews about twice a week, each time making 100 cases of beer. Jolly Pumpkin's beer compared to a name-brand beer such as Busch is the difference between Ben & Jerry's and a tub of Meijer-brand ice cream, Jeffries said.

"The big breweries do a great job making consistent beer, but it lacks a lot of character," Jeffries said. "It's all about good flavor."But one of Jeffries' specialty beers, "Fuego del Otoño"(Spanish for "autumn fire"), contains a unique ingredient chestnuts. "It's different from what we normally do," Jeffries said. "It all seemed to kind of fit together."

Jeffries described the chestnut beer as having almost a subtle cashew nut taste. "What it contributes is a unique lightness," Jeffries said. "Maybe a hint of nutty flavor."

The idea for Jeffries' chestnut beer came from half a world away.  In Italy, a country renowned for producing some of the world's best wines, the robust flavor of the amber-colored chestnut beer caught the attention of an MSU professor.  Plant pathology Professor Dennis Fulbright tasted chestnut beer at festivals around Italy and the island of Corsica on a summer trip in 2004. The chestnut beer was available in bottles, on tap and in cans. "It's a different world over there in what they eat and drink," Fulbright said.

The strong chestnut beer stayed on Fulbright's mind when he returned back to Michigan in 2005, where he advises the Chestnut Growers Inc., or CGI, a cooperative of Michigan-area chestnut growers. Fulbright told the growers about the amber-colored beer. "Nobody had ever tasted it or seen it," he said. In the United States, where stuffing and desserts use chestnuts, the concept of chestnut beer is a new one, even though it readily appears in Europe, said Bill Nash, who owns about 400 chestnut trees in Owosso, 20 miles from campus. "We just think in this country of chestnuts roasting on the open fire," Nash said.

Fulbright's trip sparked CGI to find microbreweries such as Jolly Pumpkin to make chestnut beer. Last fall, Jeffries brewed Fuego del Otoño for the first time with chestnuts. He plans to increase his production of the chestnut beer in late August because he said it was so successful. "From start to finish that beer is here about eight weeks, "Jeffries said. "The beer we brew today, you won't try for a few months."

"The big breweries do a great job making consistent beer, but it lacks a lot of character," Jeffries said. "It's all about good flavor." But one of Jeffries' specialty beers, "Fuego del Otoño" (Spanish for "autumn fire"), contains a unique ingredient chestnuts. "It's different from what we normally do," Jeffries said. "It all seemed to kind of fit together." Jeffries described the chestnut beer as having almost a subtle cashew nut taste. "What it contributes is a unique lightness," Jeffries said. "Maybe a hint of nutty flavor." 

The idea for Jeffries' chestnut beer came from half a world away. In Italy, a country renowned for producing some of the world's best wines, the robust flavor of the amber-colored chestnut beer caught the attention of an MSU professor. Plant pathology Professor Dennis Fulbright tasted chestnut beer at festivals around Italy and the island of Corsica on a summer trip in 2004. The chestnut beer was available in bottles, on tap and in cans. "It's a different world over there in what they eat and drink," Fulbright said. The strong chestnut beer stayed on Fulbright's mind when he returned back to Michigan in 2005, where he advises the Chestnut Growers Inc., or CGI, a cooperative of Michigan-area chestnut growers. Fulbright told the growers about the amber-colored beer. "Nobody had ever tasted it or seen it," he said. In the United States, where stuffing and desserts use chestnuts, the concept of chestnut beer is a new one, even though it readily appears in Europe, said Bill Nash, who owns about 400 chestnut trees in Owosso, 20 miles from campus. "We just think in this country of chestnuts roasting on the open fire," Nash said.

Fulbright's trip sparked CGI to find microbreweries such as Jolly Pumpkin to make chestnut beer. Last fall, Jeffries brewed Fuego del Otoño for the first time with chestnuts. He plans to increase his production of the chestnut beer in late August because he said it was so successful. "From start to finish that beer is here about eight weeks," Jeffries said. "The beer we brew today, you won't try for a few months." All of the ingredients come from the earth, he said. Jeffries takes boiled chestnuts and malted barley and dumps it into a hopper, which resembles a giant funnel. The barley falls into a mash tun where it gets mixed with hot water until it looks like lumpy oatmeal, or mash. The hot water triggers an enzyme process that breaks down the starches into sugars. At that point, the soon-to-be beer is a sugary liquid called wort. "The sugars are what eventually turn into beer," Jeffries said. About 330 gallons of wort flow through a pipe into a kettle to boil, where Jeffries adds hops to the brew. Hops are the cones from a plant that give the beer its bitterness. "A beer without hops would be very sweet and unpleasant to drink," Jeffries said. This entire process takes about a day, Jeffries said. Afterward, yeast is added to the mixture in fermenters. The final step is to let the beer mature for about a month in oak barrels. "Very few breweries mature beer in wood anymore," Jeffries said. By letting the beer mature traditionally, it develops a slightly tart taste because of a natural souring bacteria, he said. Jeffries' methods are unique most breweries use stainless steel for maturing the beer,